Judge Orders Google to Produce Facebook Litigant Paul Ceglia’s Gmail

The federal judge presiding over the lawsuit by plaintiff Paul Ceglia, the convicted felon claiming to own half of Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook, just ordered Google to divulge Ceglia’s Gmail account data and logs by March 5, 2012

Ceglia’s email accounts are at the heart of this lawsuit. Some were known, many were only recently discovered by lawyers for Zuckerberg and Facebook after an electronic forensics investigator learned about four previously previously unknown webmail accounts held by Ceglia. The electronic discovery could shed light on whether or not the contract he claims gives him a fifty-percent ownership stake in Facebook is real, or the fabrication that Facebook and Zuckerberg’s lawyers say it is.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Leslie Foschio ordered Google to share information on Ceglia’s Gmail accounts. The order requires Google to:

produce any information, including access logs, usage logs, registration records, and content for the Gmail Accounts, as well as any preserved copies of the Gmail Accounts, as authorized by the consent of Plaintiff [Paul Ceglia] attached hereto…

This blog recently observed that appropriate court-ordered electronic discovery of emails surrounding whatever contract existed between Ceglia and Zucerkberg was critical to moving the lawsuit forward, and ultimately, resolving the litigation.

Read the new court electronic email discovery order, and browse the Ceglia v. Facebook and Zuckerberg case docket here:

Order Ceglia v. Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg

  • newbedave

    U.S. Magistrate Judge Leslie Foschio ordered Google to share information on Ceglia’s Gmail accounts

    Yeah so if you ever need info about anyone at Harvard

    Zuck: Just ask.

    Zuck: I have over 4,000 emails, pictures, addresses, SNS
    [Redacted Friend's Name]: What? How’d you manage that one?

    Zuck: People just submitted it.
    Zuck: I don’t know why.
    Zuck: They “trust me”
    Zuck: Dumb f****

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