Courthouse News Wins First Amendment Case for Access to Court Records

Courthouse News Service won a ruling in the Ninth Circuit recently for access to court filings. CNS went to federal court last year to challenge the Ventura County Superior Court policy of delaying the release of court opinions.  A U.S. district court judge dismissed the case, finding that it was not a First Amendment issue, but a claim that involved

Seventh Circuit Clarifies When You Can Sue a City Official for Prospective Relief

Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled in Teesdale v. City of Chicago that a city’s legal argument in a civil proceeding does not constitute its official policy. One of the threshold questions before a person or entity may sue another in federal court is one of judicial standing. When the person or entity is

Should Foreigners Face Limits on Political Speech?

Who is an American? For a “corporate person,” does the answer depend on where the corporation is headquartered? Or, should we look at the composition of its workforce? Last week, I looked at some tax data found in various securities filings to calculate the tax rate paid by various corporations. Today, I wanted to see how “American” some American companies

SCOTUS Updates

The Supreme Court has handed down opinions in some of the cases that we blogged about back in October. Here are the updates. FCC v. ATT Back in October, I wondered whether this case would add to the growing list of personal rights for corporations. The short answer is no. The Court held that corporations are not entitled to a

Cyber Monday

These presents aren’t going to wrap themselves, folks. You’re at work, but you’re on Amazon and Overstock searching for deals, right? It’s Cyber Monday–the online equivalent of Black Friday, where the web stores are jammed with consumers distracted at work. Amazon and Target even have special sales on this day and advertise with the adwords “Cyber Monday.” I guess I’m

Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell = Can’t Recruit, Can’t Retain

Yesterday, we discussed some of the evidence presented at trial in Log Cabin Republicans v. United States of America et al., a case heard in the United States District Court Central District of California by Judge Virginia A. Phillips. Today, we continue with the court’s analysis and conclusion. Analysis of Evidence and Findings of Fact Based on the evidence presented,

US Supreme Court to Hear Military Funeral Protest Case

Credit: Westboro Baptist Church The first Monday in October marks the opening of the 2010 term for the United States Supreme Court. During this week, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a number of cases, including one that examines the boundaries of the First Amendment. In Snyder v. Phelps, Albert Snyder, the father of a deceased Marine had