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We are pleased to announce the launch of our newly designed marketing website. There you can find descriptions of the legal marketing services we offer, read testimonials from a few of our many satisfied clients, and talk to one of our legal marketing specialists about how we can help your law firm grow its business.

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Moving your site to HTTPS isn't just a good idea, it is vital to your success, but doing so presents some challenges that you may not be aware of. Here we outline some of the challenges you'll face and issues you need to pay attention to when you add HTTPS to your site.

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One of the best investments a law firm can make is in high-quality, original, focused content for their website. Content not only drives SEO, but it is also crucial for attracting and retaining readers, and for converting those readers into clients. Justia CEO Tim Stanley offers insight on how to write high-quality content, and he discusses the importance of having that content also be both original (non-duplicative) and focused.

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Search engines have long tried to extrapolate meaning from the content of your web pages. While they have gotten pretty good at it, it is easier for them if you can be explicit in the meaning of your content. The best way to do that is by using structured data. In this post we explain what Structured Data is, and how you can implement it in your content.

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The American Bar Association periodically publishes a document that describes legal marketing rules for every state, detailing how they deviate from the corresponding ABA Model Rule. This document covers everything from restrictions on client testimonials to required language related to certain fees. Some of these rules may be particularly relevant in the realm of Internet legal marketing, so we highlight a few of these for you.

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Most states regulate attorneys' use of the words "expert," "specialist," and other terms that could be misleading or suggest a guaranteed outcome in their clients' cases. Although it is a relatively new area of regulation, many states agree that such restrictions apply also to the domain names for lawyers' websites. For example, both Ohio and Kentucky prohibit lawyers from using domain names with deceptive, fraudulent, exaggerated, or false information. While in some states, some attorney advertising restrictions have been struck down as violating the First Amendment, the unsettled nature of the law in this area suggests that attorneys exercise caution when choosing a domain name that may contain certain terms. The information in this blog post is for informational purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice.

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When using a website or blog to market your law firm, you should be careful to avoid using language or portrayals that your state bar considers "misleading." Three areas in which attorneys should be particularly careful about misleading material include: (1) language related to fees, including what prospective clients are and are not responsible for, (2) statements that can be construed to predict success, and (3) the use of actors to portray lawyers or events leading to lawsuits.

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